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Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuts. the sequester has been called off. mr. boehner would like a down payment on entitlements. i don't see that happening. to me remember it used to be 3-1 or 4-1 spending cuts to revenue increases. right now it looks to me like it's 10-1. 10-0. $10 of revenue hikes and no spending cuts, jimmy pethokoukis. >> i think what we're going to get at the end of the day, you're going to get a lot of tax increases, and then you're going to get a lot of promises about caps and mechanisms. be careful of the word "process." there's going to be a process in place for looking at further spending cuts. or entitlement reform. but that's all going to be like tomorrow, the day after tomorrow, the 12th of never. what we're going to get right away are tax increases in an economy that's going to be really slow. it was slow last year, slow before. the economic reports out today, terrible. and we're going to try a little experiment about raising taxes in a lousy economy. hop it works. >> jared, jimmy's got a point. the industrial production number, no matter how you slice it, with the hurricane or without
boehner today or not? >> no. this was no olive branch, larry. i was quite disappointed with that speech and press conference. and you noted that the stock market really collapsed as president obama was speaking because he seems not just today but the event that he had on friday, the two statements that he's made, he's been pretty emphatic that he wants those tax rates to go up, come hell or high water. that is going to lead to a mexican standoff with the republicans if he sticks with that position. i'd like to make one other point about that press conference, larry. i listened to the whole 45 minutes to 60-minute press conference, and not once that i could hear in that speech did he talk about the most important thing, which is cutting government spending. why don't we get the government spending down and then talk about raising taxes? >> you know, if you google up spending and obama, you know what you get? nothing. blank pages. you get nothing. >> in fact, larry, he said he wants his $100 billion stimulus, he wants more spending when he's talking -- trying to talk about lowering the de
the president sat between house speaker john boehner and senate majority leader harry reid calling for cooperation and compromise. >> we've got to make sure that taxes don't go up on middle-class families, that our economy remains strong, that we're creating jobs, and that's an agenda that democrats and republicans and independents, people all across the country, share. so, our challenge is to make sure that, you know, we are able to cooperate together, work together. >> joining me now for more, congressional reporter for "the washington post" ed o'keefe and national journal correspondent nancy cook. good morning both of you. last time we saw those three together, sort of a kumbayah moment when you have reid and boehner and mcconnell together. did you get a sense, ed, putting revenue on the table meant republicans were open to tax hikes for those makes $250,000 or more? >> no, they're not. they still say they don't want to see that increase. by talking about revenues the idea is you close loopholes, find a way to perhaps limit deductions and create revenue that way. but you know, b
directly at odds with house speaker john boehner. >> could you accept a deal that does not include tax rate increases for the wealthy? we've seen talk about a possible compromise that could leave rates the same but cap deductions for high-income earners. is that something that's acceptable? >> no. >> not at all no, way? >> no. the preponderance made it very clear in his campaign that there are not enough -- what you just described is a formula and a blueprint for hampering our future. you cannot go forward -- you have to cut some investments. if you cut too many you are hampering growth, you're hampering education, investments for the future. >> and even thousands of miles away it appears president obama is still focused on those negotiations. while touring a royal monastery with secretary of state clinton in thailand the president was overheard mentioning the budget talks to a monk. the president later clarified his comments -- >> he's not any monk. >> no. >> he has some big i vestments in the stock market. >> he later clarified his comments at a news conference. >> yes, we were working on
that in place we are removing half of the fiscal cliff. >> speaker john boehner offered what he considers a balanced approach generating the revenue from tax reform and entitlement reform. late today, boehner said the president's position is flawed. >> we are not going to hurt our economy an make job creation more difficult. which is exactly what that plan would do. >> letter sent by the u.s. chamber of commerce and signed by 232 organizations calls on the president and congress to immediately extend all the tax cuts and find other cuts to replace sequestration. the president suggested taking a closer look at reforming entitlements without offing details and says he would like to simplify the tax code. mr. obama says he wants congress to act now to extend tax cut for middle class and try to avoid boxing himself in on upcoming negotiation. >> i'm open to come plo mize and new ideas. i have been encouraged for republicans to agree to more revenue as part of the arithmetic if we are serious to reduce deficit. >> the top republican in senate who is a key player in upcoming talks says raising
boehner appears, they say are you willing to accept higher rates. no one says what are you going to do about entitlements or anything, there's no question of the president whether he will compromise and what that would look like. >> paul: steve, what do you think the republicans ought to do here? is there a way out for them or are they going to be pushed back into a corner where they have no choice, but to concede that they have to raise tax rates or else go over the cliff and get blamed for that? >> well, it's a tough situation for them. there's no question about it because as you know, the default position, if we don't do anything is for the taxes to go up on everybody on january 1st, and that's something i think both sides want to avoid. it's very interesting, the thing that happened this week to start the week, was who was the first person that barack obama met with in the white house since his election, the labor unions, the labor block, that tells a lot who is driving policy at least at the start of the second term? and the labor unions basically said we want no compromise on thi
isn't serious. it's a joke. a joke. >> house speaker john boehner has been far milder in this rhetoric. according to politico, some house republicans might consider a tax hike on millionaires. many republican lawmakers privately concede that the 2012 election left them far short of a mandate on taxes. and if urged by democrats to raise rates on the megawealthy, they will have a tough time resisting. for the record, president obama's position sounds much more in line with senator sanders' way of thinking. >> there are some tough things that have to be done, but there's a way of doing this that does not hurt middle class families, that does not hurt our seniors, doesn't hurt families with disabled kids. >> let's bring in ruth conif, political editor for the progressive magazine. also with us tonight, e.j. dionne, msnbc contributor, "washington post" columnist and author of the book "our divided political heart." great to have both of you with us tonight. ruth, you first. you know, this could set up to be a moment of real disappointment for liberals if the democrats can't close the deal.
connell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hikes. in other words, no cuts at all. it's a joke. a joke. >> we right away say 98% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place, we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. >> okay. so is it a joke, or as the democrats would say, the math isn't adding up? let's look at the issue of deficit reduction. the democrats say the -- let's say if you cut loopholes
.6 trillion of new revenue. boehner had agreed to $800 billion. it's not hard to find $1.2 trillion as a kind of middle ground to that. then you want to have $4 trillion of total deficit reduction, so that leaves $2.8 trillion of spending reductions that have to happen. here's what people miss. we can avoid going over the cliff with the stroke of a pen. they can just extend all this stuff and kick the can down the road. the real question is are we going to have a big deal? are we going to agree on the major spending restraints that we need as well as the tax stuff in order to actually get the deficit under control? and i think the betting on that is less than 50%. i think we have a great shot at it. but it's going to be really, really hard. >> is that the view from wall street, too? they're not totally confident that this is going to happen? >> what you see in the stock market at the moment is that wall street is not totally confident. that's for sure. >> all right. steve, thanks so much. >> pleasure. >>> coming up, independent senator-elect of maine, angus king joins the conversation. he's a
't happen under reaga un reagan. it did happen under bush. >> there is agreement all around that boehner wants a deal. the speaker wants a deal, but he cannot sell a deal, even with the goodwill that he thinks he and the president have on that right now, unless there is real graham ruddman type, real requirements, that these things go in simultaneously. and that's what jim baker wrote about recently, who's had that experience, of fashioning exactly that kind of deal. >> it's important, though, that -- >> you have to cut spending in the future. >> you can raise taxes with one congress. but it takes five congresses to cut spending. >> it's important to keep the focus on growth. not taxes, not spending cuts. you know, the goal here is to get our growth from, you know, one plus percent, up to three and four percent. if we don't get growth going, none of this will matter at all. it's really important as the president frames this that he frames it as growth, and therefore i need this tax increase for these people. this kind of spending cuts here. because it will leverage this kind of growth. >
and overspending problem and not an under taxing problem. we heard from speaker john boehner. he said that revenue is on the table. the issue here is that president obama has said he wants to increase tax rates on wealthy americans. the speaker and house republicans are still not on board with increasing tax rates, although perhaps closing some loopholes to raise some revenue, and even though there's a lot of kind of kumbaya going on here, suzanne, there's still a lot of tough work that needs to be done. they're still maybe punting on some of the important issues like tax reform and entitlement reform, but they'll be dealing with the fiscal cliff here in the near term. >> it's probably difficult to tell, but we see these pictures, and it's very common, right? you get about 30 seconds to see them all in a room together. they're patting each other on the back, smiling, and shaking hands, that kind of thick. do we have any sense of whether or not there were any different kind of tone or language when they were meeting behind closed doors that gives us a sense that maybe this is real? >> you know, i t
when you saw nancy pelosi out there. you saw john boehner out there saying we are hopeful we can get a deal done. and the market had a positive reaction to that. yet it lost that upside throughout the day, teetered back and forth between positive and negative territory. finally, closing the day out positive, so perhaps that suggests that maybe we are a little bit closer. but here's the thing, randi, they've got to get something done. they've got to solve this issue. because if not, the consequences are severe. >> but you listen to some people, and they suggest that fears of fallen off the cliff are overblown. what are the real consequences here? >> the real consequences are another recession. i mean, i can tell you every ceo that i'm talking to right now says i'm not making major decisions. i'm waiting. i'm standing by the sidelines. i can't hire a lot of people, i can't invest in a lot of infrastructure because i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next 45 days. i don't know what the landscape is going to be in the next three months. so there's a lot of holdup. now,
republicans. listen who what house speaker john boehner said about that throwing cold water on it. >> at this point i think that the standing committees of the house whether they be the oversight committee or the intelligence committee are working diligently on these issues, and at this point i think that's appropriate. >> now, what john mccain and his colleagues are arguing is that there's too much stove piping going on. there are too many committees, and twoul today is a good example. there are hearings going on all over capitol hill and then probably will continue to be. they think it all should be streamlined into one committee, but, suzanne, using the term watergate, using the term coverup, saying what did he know, when did he know it, talking about the president, not exactly a way to get bipartisan support for something that, you know, democrats clearly don't want. it is absolutely -- you mentioned at the beginning, very, very tense, particularly between these two old rivals, john mccain and president obama. >> not the way to bite -- get the bipartisanship going. okay, dana.
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)